My love/hate relationship with recruitment for the web

Let’s start off on a bit of a controversial point.

I quite like LinkedIn.

Yep, that’s right, I actually find it useful. Yes, I get far too many emails from the platform, and why on Earth I get messages from what is the world’s largest professional network about my connection’s birthdays I am yet to fathom.

But one of the biggest gripes I have both heard and experienced for myself is the sheer number of recruiters touting job vacancies left, right and centre.

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Farewell, web safe fonts

I’ve begun work on a redesign of this site (as everyone does on an almost monthly basis) and one of my aims was to see how fast I could get the site in terms of performance, what with that being the big thing lately (as well it should be).

One of my target areas would be to reduce the number of requests on a page and to minimise the amount of, if not completely remove the need for, JavaScript.

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A good workman never blames his tools

As the saying goes, “A good workman never blames his tools”. And yet, over the last year or so, there has been huge growth in the emphasis placed on tools and workflow. So much so that the definition of being a good designer or developer is becoming blurred with how proficient you are with a given set of tools.

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How to scare thousands of people in the shortest time possible

Or “The worst way to announce school admissions on a website”.

Setting the scene

It’s the day before you are due to find out if your child is going to get his or her place in the first step in to the education system.

As a parent you’ve spent endless hours researching local schools, pouring through Ofsted reports, factoring in the distances for the school runs, and countless other things to make the right decision for the little person in your life.

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The human element of accessibility

I was lucky enough to be invited to speak at Second Wednesday this month, and was even luckier to be given a choice of dates at which I could speak. When I found out that my fellow speaker on my chosen night, Kimberley Tew, would be speaking about accessibility, it was a no-brainer for me.

I wrote a little bit about the issue I see with our knowledge on accessibility a little while back, but what I witnessed on the night absolutely hammered home the true impact of what poorly built site can have on a person. On another human being.

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Wot I Learned from Dan Eden at Hey!Stac

As speaking now seems to be one of those things that I now do, there are some great benefits that come along with it, and for me, the biggest of those benefits is getting to hear other people giving talks.

Hey!Stac was put on by We Are Stac, with Josh Nesbitt acting as compere at The Faversham in Leeds.

Dan Eden, who was nominated for .net Magazine’s “Brilliant Newcomer of The Year” award earlier this year, was first to take the stage on the night. I initially recognised Dan from said nominations, and a quick Google later and I realised I’d already played around with one of his creations, namely Animate.css.

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What I mean by responsive design

A retweet, courtesy of Mark Asquith, popped up in my Twitter timeline regarding an article on Econsultancy titled “What do you mean by responsive design?”.

An interesting and thought provoking article, and the main point I took away was made at the very end;

There is no way we would promise to build a client ‘a website’ without defining specifics. Why then are we happy to promise to build a ‘responsive site’ while leaving the exact nature of what that means rather vague?

This is an extremely good point, and it’s one that I have been thinking about a lot over the past month or so.

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